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Tips for New School Careers Advisers

From day 1, new school Career Advisers hit the ground running. Students seek assistance with many career questions.

  • What subjects should I study to get into a course in..?
  • How do I get an Australian School-Based Apprenticeship?
  • What education institutions offer courses in..?
  • How do I get a part-time job?
  • How do I apply for courses I want to study next year?
  • Where can I find out about scholarships?
  • How do I decide what career direction to take when I finish school?
  • I’m not coping with a subject that I need to get into a course I want to study next year and I’m not sure what to do?

These are just a few typical career questions of school students!

Here are 4 tips to help new Career Advisers manage their day-to-day work.

Tip 1: Career Information Websites

There are many websites with accurate and quality information, that can be used to support students and their families with career concerns.

The Australian Apprenticeships Pathways website is a one-stop shop with everything students, their family and friends, and Career Advisers need to know about Australian Apprenticeships and Traineeships, Australia-wide and for each individual state or territory. The site also has resources that Careers Advisers can download for career classes, career libraries and for distribution to students and families.

myfuture is Australia’s online career information service, with information on over 400 career options and related education and training courses. Students can explore occupations by keyword or by school subject area. Occupations link to related courses, and courses can be searched by keyword. The My Profile section allows students to identify occupations that relate to their career interests, planned level of education and other preferences. Career Insight articles help individuals to manage their career throughout life. Some myfuture features require a log-in.

Tip 2: Online Tools to Support Careers Advisers

Career Tools is a low-cost system that provides a careers website customised for each school. State or territory specific information is provided, with scope for schools to tailor information to their specific context.

Grow Careers is a freely available website for all Australian school communities. Taking a national perspective, Grow Careers applies lifelong career development in the context of schools and provides career information to support the career development needs of students in the middle and secondary years, their parents and carers, past students and school staff with their own career development concerns. The site is a clearinghouse of useful websites and web pages for careers work in school contexts.

Australian Apprenticeships information and resources for Career Advisers

Career Adviser Page

Tip 3: Professional Learning

Two recently published books by Australian career practitioners provide helpful information and advice to Career Advisers.

Introducing Career Education and Development: A guide for personnel in educational institutions in both developed and developing countries by Colin McCowan, Malcolm McKenzie, and Mansi Shah is a great resource for Career Advisers wanting to develop a quality career education and development program in their school.  

Careers work in schools: A primer for career development facilitators by Catherine Hughes is a brief, practical guide for delivering evidence-based career services in schools.

Tip 4: Networking

Joining a professional association for Career Practitioners provides opportunities for networking and getting ideas from other career development specialists as well as professional learning opportunities. The Career Industry Council of Australia’s website lists all national, state and territory professional associations.

About the author

We would like to thank Dr. Catherine Hughes from Grow Careers for this article.

Catherine Hughes is the founder of the Grow Careers website for Australian school communities and author of books on careers work in schools. She has 30 years experience in designing and delivering school career services.

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