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Transmission, Distribution and Rail Sector

The future of how electricity is transmitted and distributed is predicted to change dramatically over the next 10 years.

The ESI Transmission, Distribution, and Rail (ESI TDR) industry refers to Australia's infrastructure networks that transmit high-voltage electricity from generators to distribution networks, and ultimately to residential and industrial consumers directly. Power lines and substations make up the transmission network.

Licensed occupations and registrations

Electrical Linespersons require licensing by their state or territory authority. The Electrical Regulatory Authorities Council has links to each regulator.

What does this industry cover?

The Transmission, Distribution and Rail sectors convey electricity from the generating power stations to the consumer, through networks that include the following sections:

  • The transmission of electricity by overhead towers or poles, at voltages substantially higher than those used for distribution
  • The transmission of electricity by means of underground cables that are usually oil or gas filled
  • The distribution of electricity by overhead conductors and poles in the rail system
  • The distribution of electricity by underground cabling

Job hunting information

With the advancement in new technologies on how our electricity will be transmitted and distributed it is important that you study STEM and have digital literacy skills. Predicted jobs of the future in this sector could mean that you will need to be multi skilled, understand smart grids and big data. You will be encouraged to embrace lifelong learning so that you will constantly have the skills to evolve and remain current to ongoing technologies.

Employers are looking for workers with soft skills in creativity, communication and complex problem solving.

You will be required to work outdoors and be able to work at heights or in confined spaces. You may work in remote locations and be required to do shift work.

 

Information for further research

Industry information is published by peak level associations, government and major employers.  Accessing industry association sites, including member lists, is a good way of building up an understanding of an industry.  Visiting employer websites and looking for careers or employment menus helps identify how employers recruit and the skills they are recruiting.

Employment and wage data for this industry

Apprenticeships Employment Size

This is a small industry for Australian Apprenticeship commencements. In the year to September 2019, commencements were: 343

Source: VOCSTATS, extracted on 14/04/2020. AATIS analysis.

Commencements Change

Commencements in the year to September 2019 in this industry have remained stable, compared with the previous year.

Source: VOCSTATS, extracted on 14/04/2020. AATIS analysis.

Apprentice Employment Outcomes

For Australian Apprentice graduates from this industry, employment outcomes are high.

Source: NCVER National Student Outcomes Survey, 2017, unpublished. AATIS analysis.

Industry Employment Size

This is a small to medium sized industry compared with other Australian industries.

Source: Department of Education, Skills and Employment, 2019. AATIS analysis.

Industry Employment Change

Over the past 5 years, change in employment in this industry has decreased.

Source: Department of Education, Skills and Employment, 2019. AATIS analysis.

Industry Wage

The average wage of all employees in this industry is medium.

Source: Department of Education, Skills and Employment, 2019. AATIS analysis.

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