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Want to stay in school AND start your career?

Have you heard of an Australian School-based Apprenticeship? 

An Australian School-based Apprenticeship (ASbA) allows participants to undertake a traineeship or apprenticeship in combination with their secondary schooling. Much like full time apprenticeships and traineeships, participants earn a wage, train with an employer, and work towards an accredited qualification while undertaking your high school certificate.

Eligibility, structure, and availability varies state-by-state. We have provided a break down of ASbAs in each state below.

Australian School-based Apprenticeships by State

Victoria

Who can do an ASbA?

School Based Apprenticeships and Traineeships are available to secondary school students who are over 15 years old and enrolled in Victorian Certificate of Education or Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning. You can find out more here.

How do I complete my ASbA and my school-work?

The minimum number of employment and training hours is 13 hours per week, which is made up of 7 hours of employment and 6 hours of training.

These hours may be averaged over 3 periods of 4 months in each year of the training contract.

At least 1 day during the normal school week must be timetabled to be spent on the job or in training. Schools should only endorse the training program when:

  • it forms an integral part of the student's school learning program and study timetable
  • it can be verified that the student's timetable includes 1 day of the normal school week in employment and/or structured training as an apprentice or trainee

Normal school hours are generally between 8:30am and 3:30pm, however schools may set their own normal hours and normal week.

RTOs should consult with the school about their hours and ensure the SBAT program satisfies the requirements above.

Employment outside normal school hours

If the only time a student can obtain employment is outside normal school hours, the student is permitted but must then complete at least 1 day of structured training per week during normal school hours to fulfil the SBAT requirements.

This may happen in an industry that operates early or late, such as bakeries, horse-racing stables or hospitality.

Employment over holiday periods

A school-based apprentice or trainee’s employment and structured training obligations may be averaged over 3 periods of 4 months in each year of the program. This allows for employment to be undertaken in school holiday periods.

Regardless of the amount of employment undertaken in school holidays, school-based apprentices and trainees must still have at least 1 day of each school week during normal school hours timetabled to be spent on the job or in structured training.

Apprenticeships that are not integrated into a learning program

Students who undertake an apprenticeship or traineeship that is not integrated into their learning program and study timetable will be undertaking a part-time apprenticeship or traineeship instead.

This type of arrangement will still provide credit for VCE or VCAL if it is recorded on the Victorian Assessment Software System (VASS). These arrangements do not require school endorsement. These arrangements are at an individual student’s discretion and do not attract Skills First or Targeted VET funding subsidies.

More information can be found here.

Is an ASbA the same as VET in Schools?

There are several differences between VET in schools and ASbAs. Primarily, ASbA’s require paid employment through a ‘third party’ employer whilst VET in Schools require students to complete VET units through a TAFE or RTO.

Students can choose to complete VET studies as part of their senior school certificate. In these cases, the VET units may count towards the student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) or Overall Position (OP). If a VET subject is not available at their school, students can enrol at a TAFE or other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) — in some cases, even a neighbouring school. Students who complete VET studies in Years 11 and 12 may be granted Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) if they choose to progress to higher-level study.

ASbA’s involve students completing an apprenticeship or traineeship part time during their senior secondary studies, with options including anything from carpentry to hairdressing.

Victorian students also have the choice of the Vocational Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) — a hands-on alternative to the VCE. The VCAL program covers four core areas: literacy and numeracy skills, work-related skills, industry-specific skills and personal development skills.  Students complete the certificate in Years 11 and 12 and may be awarded a qualification at one of three levels: foundation, intermediate or senior.  VCAL students can complete work placements and attend TAFE classes, and may also undertake some VCE-level units.

Students in Victoria and Queensland can attend specialised trade colleges that combine traditional academic classes with trade and technical education programs. Students are able to work towards a VET qualification while completing Years 11 and 12.

You can find out more here.

What Apprenticeships can I undertake with an ASbA?

Eligible ASbAs vary state-to-state. When considering an ASbA, choose an apprenticeship or traineeship that is approved as an ASbA in your state.

You can find this information in the Job and Training Description Search. When searching, be sure you are looking at the information true for your state.

Once you have considered your options and decided on an apprenticeship or traineeship, you must find an employer who is willing to take you on as an ASbA. The Steps to an Australian Apprenticeship gives tips on what to do.

Once you have found an employer, an Australian Apprenticeship Support Network provider will need to do the sign up. They will talk to the employer, the school, and if you are under 18 to your parent or caregiver.

Victoria continued

No-one at my school is doing one, does that mean I can’t?

Your school must approve your ASbA before you start, and will help facilitate details of the employment and training. Your school timetable will need to work with your ASbA training and employment.

By starting an Australian Apprenticeship under a school based arrangement, you may be able to knock 1-2 years off an apprenticeship and even complete a traineeship depending on the qualification. The duration depends on the type of apprenticeship or traineeship, the industry and the qualification.

If you are interested in starting a School-based Apprenticeship, it’s important to speak to the relevant teacher, Careers Advisor, or Career Counsellor at your school as soon as possible to find out the opportunities available in your district and how to access them.

New South Wales

Who can do an ASbA?

School-based Apprenticeships and Traineeships allow year 10, 11 and 12 high school students to commence an apprenticeship or complete a traineeship. School-based apprentices work part-time and undertake the first stage of their formal or off-the-job apprenticeship training. You can find out more here.

How do I complete my ASbA and my school-work?

All school-based apprentices must study HSC VET courses that match the training provided to first year full-time apprentices. These HSC VET courses will generally contribute a minimum of 4 units of HSC credit out of the 22 units required for the HSC.

The formal training undertaken by a school-based trainee will also contribute a minimum of 4 units of credit required for the HSC. A list of competencies will be submitted by the school to the NSW Education Standards Authority. Additional HSC unit credit may be applicable for both school-based apprenticeship and school-based traineeship courses depending on the qualification.

School-based apprentices/trainees may also elect to undertake the Industry-Based Learning Board Endorsed Course that can contribute up to 4 additional units of HSC credit. Assessment of these units will be based on evidence of industry-based skills built up through paid employment as an apprentice/trainee during the HSC years.

More information can be found here.

Is an ASbA like VET in Schools?

There are several differences between VET in schools and ASbAs. Primarily, ASbA’s require paid employment through a ‘third party’ employer whilst VET in Schools require students to complete VET units through a TAFE or RTO.

Students can choose to complete VET studies as part of their senior school certificate. In these cases, the VET units may count towards the student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) or Overall Position (OP). If a VET subject is not available at their school, students can enrol at a TAFE or other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) — in some cases, even a neighbouring school. Students who complete VET studies in Years 11 and 12 may be granted Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) if they choose to progress to higher-level study.

ASbA’s involve students completing an apprenticeship or traineeship part time during their senior secondary studies, with options including anything from carpentry to hairdressing.

You can find out more here.

What Apprenticeships can I undertake with an ASbA?

Eligible ASbAs vary state-to-state. When considering an ASbA, choose an apprenticeship or traineeship that is approved as an ASbA in your state.

You can find this information in the Job and Training Description Search. When searching, be sure you are looking at the information true for your state.

Once you have considered your options and decided on an apprenticeship or traineeship for you, you must find an employer who is willing to take you on as an ASbA. The Steps to an Australian Apprenticeship gives tips on what to do.

Once you have found an employer, an Australian Apprenticeship Support Network provider will need to do the sign up. They will talk to the employer, the school, and if you are under 18 to your parent or caregiver.

No-one at my school is doing one, does that mean I can’t?

Your school must approve your ASbA before you start, and will help facilitate details of the employment and training. Your school timetable will need to work with your ASbA training and employment.

By starting an Australian Apprenticeship under a school-based arrangement, you may be able to knock 1-2 years off an apprenticeship and even complete a traineeship depending on the qualification. The duration depends on the type of apprenticeship or traineeship, the industry and the qualification.

If you are interested in starting a School-based Apprenticeship, it’s important to speak to the relevant teacher, Careers Advisor, or Career Counsellor at your school as soon as possible to find out the opportunities available in your district and how to access them.

ACT

Who can do an ASbA?

An ASbA offers students, 15 years of age or over, the opportunity to achieve a nationally recognised vocational qualification by combining paid work and training as part of their education program. You can find out more here.

How do I complete my ASbA and my school-work?

To be eligible for an ACT training contract an ASbA must:

  • complete a minimum of 11 hours per week and a maximum of 20 hours per week if undertaking a Certificate II qualification. This includes eight hours of work and three hours per week of structured training
  • complete a minimum of 15 hours per week and a maximum of 20 hours per week if undertaking a Certificate III qualification. This includes 12 hours of work and three hours per week of structured training.

ASbAs who are undertaking a Certificate II qualification will be entitled to a maximum of 2 units a semester in the relevant industry area (1 unit for structured training and 1 unit for on-the-job training).

ASbAs who are undertaking a Certificate III qualification will be entitled to a maximum of 3 units a semester in the relevant industry area (1 unit for structured training and 2 units for on-the-job training).

The maximum contribution of any one course area to the minimum requirements of an ACT Senior Secondary Certificate is 8 standard units as per BSSS policy.

More information can be found here.

Is an ASbA like VET in Schools?

There are several differences between VET in schools and ASbAs. Primarily, ASbA’s require paid employment through a ‘third party’ employer whilst VET in Schools require students to complete VET units through a TAFE or RTO.

Students can choose to complete VET studies as part of their senior school certificate. In these cases, the VET units may count towards the student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) or Overall Position (OP). If a VET subject is not available at their school, students can enrol at a TAFE or other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) — in some cases, even a neighbouring school. Students who complete VET studies in Years 11 and 12 may be granted Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) if they choose to progress to higher-level study.

ASbA’s involve students completing an apprenticeship or traineeship part time during their senior secondary studies, with options including anything from carpentry to hairdressing.

You can find out more here.

What Apprenticeships can I undertake with an ASbA?

Eligible ASbAs vary state-to-state. When considering an ASbA, choose an apprenticeship or traineeship that is approved as an ASbA in your state.

You can find this information in the Job and Training Description Search. When searching, be sure you are looking at the information true for your state.

Once you have considered your options and decided on an apprenticeship or traineeship, you must find an employer who is willing to take you on as an ASbA. The Steps to an Australian Apprenticeship gives tips on what to do.

Once you have found an employer, an Australian Apprenticeship Support Network provider will need to do the sign up. They will talk to the employer, the school, and if you are under 18 to your parent or caregiver.

No-one at my school is doing one, does that mean I can’t?

Your school must approve your ASbA before you start, and will help facilitate details of the employment and training. Your school timetable will need to work with your ASbA training and employment.

By starting an Australian Apprenticeship under a school-based arrangement, you may be able to knock 1-2 years off an apprenticeship and even complete a traineeship depending on the qualification. The duration depends on the type of apprenticeship or traineeship, the industry and the qualification.

If you are interested in starting a School-based Apprenticeship, it’s important to speak to the relevant teacher, Careers Advisor, or Career Counsellor at your school as soon as possible to find out the opportunities available in your district and how to access them.

Queensland

Who can do an ASbA?

School-based apprenticeships and traineeships (SATs) allow high school students, generally in Years 10, 11 or 12, to work for an employer and train towards a recognised qualification, while completing their secondary schooling and studying for their Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) and/or Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR). You can find out more here.

How do I complete my ASbA and my school-work?

The level of impact on a student's school timetable is not mandated. In most cases, the student's school is best placed to decide whether proposed arrangements impact sufficiently so that the apprenticeship or traineeship forms part of the student's school program and can be undertaken under school-based arrangements.

Possible ways that a SAT may impact on a student's school timetable may include:

  • paid employment undertaken during normal school hours, and/or
  • training undertaken during normal school hours, and/or
  • reducing the number of subjects studied to allow the student to work and/or train.

For example, the school-based apprentice or trainee may attend work on Wednesday afternoons instead of sport; a foreign language subject may be dropped to undertake the SAT. The amended timetable must reflect the changes made to accommodate the SAT.

There is no requirement to document the student's full school, training and work schedule (other than the school timetable) in a particular way, however the parties must be able to show, at audit, a schedule has been developed and the parties have agreed to it.

You can find more information here.

Is an ASbA like VET in Schools?

There are several differences between VET in schools and ASbAs. Primarily, ASbA’s require paid employment through a ‘third party’ employer whilst VET in Schools require students to complete VET units through a TAFE or RTO.

Students can choose to complete VET studies as part of their senior school certificate. In these cases, the VET units may count towards the student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) or Overall Position (OP). If a VET subject is not available at their school, students can enrol at a TAFE or other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) — in some cases, even a neighbouring school. Students who complete VET studies in Years 11 and 12 may be granted Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) if they choose to progress to higher-level study.

ASbA’s involve students completing an apprenticeship or traineeship part time during their senior secondary studies, with options including anything from carpentry to hairdressing.

Students in Queensland and Victorian can attend specialised trade colleges that combine traditional academic classes with trade and technical education programs. Students are able to work towards a VET qualification while completing Years 11 and 12.

You can find out more here.

What Apprenticeships can I undertake with an ASbA?

Eligible ASbAs vary state-to-state. When considering an ASbA, choose an apprenticeship or traineeship that is approved as an ASbA in your state.

You can find this information in the Job and Training Description Search. When searching, be sure you are looking at the information true for your state.

Once you have considered your options and decided on an apprenticeship or traineeship, you must find an employer who is willing to take you on as an ASbA. The Steps to an Australian Apprenticeship gives tips on what to do.

Once you have found an employer, an Australian Apprenticeship Support Network provider will need to do the sign up. They will talk to the employer, the school, and if you are under 18 to your parent or caregiver.

No-one at my school is doing one, does that mean I can’t?

Your school must approve your ASbA before you start, and will help facilitate details of the employment and training. Your school timetable will need to work with your ASbA training and employment.

By starting an Australian Apprenticeship under a school-based arrangement, you may be able to knock 1-2 years off an apprenticeship and even complete a traineeship depending on the qualification. The duration depends on the type of apprenticeship or traineeship, the industry and the qualification.

If you are interested in starting a School-based Apprenticeship, it’s important to speak to the relevant teacher, Careers Advisor, or Career Counsellor at your school as soon as possible to find out the opportunities available in your district and how to access them.

Northern Territory

Who can do an ASbA?

Participation in school based apprenticeships and traineeships is open to any student enrolled in a registered school aged 15 years or older.

Usually VET programs are available to Year 11 and 12 students as they have completed general education and have the maturity to make decisions which involve commitment to training. Year 10 students wishing to participate in VET programs will be assessed on a case by case basis.

You can find out more here.

How do I complete my ASbA and my school-work?

School based Apprenticeships (SBA) operate on one or two days per week and are paid employment and training. Students need to approach employers and apply for a SBA using similar strategies as they would for any job. SBA’s are available throughout Darwin in a wide range of industries. They are often at the Certificate II or Certificate III level.

To apply for an SBA decide on Industry area/Apprenticeship, participate in Work Experience to make sure it is the right choice and then register with a Group Training Company OR find an Employer.

You can find out more here.

Is an ASbA like VET in Schools?

There are several differences between VET in schools and ASbAs. Primarily, ASbA’s require paid employment through a ‘third party’ employer whilst VET in Schools require students to complete VET units through a TAFE or RTO.

Students can choose to complete VET studies as part of their senior school certificate. In these cases, the VET units may count towards the student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) or Overall Position (OP). If a VET subject is not available at their school, students can enrol at a TAFE or other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) — in some cases, even a neighbouring school. Students who complete VET studies in Years 11 and 12 may be granted Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) if they choose to progress to higher-level study.

ASbA’s involve students completing an apprenticeship or traineeship part time during their senior secondary studies, with options including anything from carpentry to hairdressing.

You can find out more here.

What Apprenticeships can I undertake with an ASbA?

Eligible ASbAs vary state-to-state. When considering an ASbA, choose an apprenticeship or traineeship that is approved as an ASbA in your state.

You can find this information in the Job and Training Description Search. When searching, be sure you are looking at the information true for your state.

Once you have considered your options and decided on an apprenticeship or traineeship, you must find an employer who is willing to take you on as an ASbA. The Steps to an Australian Apprenticeship gives tips on what to do.

Once you have found an employer, an Australian Apprenticeship Support Network provider will need to do the sign up. They will talk to the employer, the school, and if you are under 18 to your parent or caregiver.

No-one at my school is doing one, does that mean I can’t?

Your school must approve your ASbA before you start, and will help facilitate details of the employment and training. Your school timetable will need to work with your ASbA training and employment.

By starting an Australian Apprenticeship under a school-based arrangement, you may be able to knock 1-2 years off an apprenticeship and even complete a traineeship depending on the qualification. The duration depends on the type of apprenticeship or traineeship, the industry and the qualification.

If you are interested in starting a School-based Apprenticeship, it’s important to speak to the relevant teacher, Careers Advisor, or Career Counsellor at your school as soon as possible to find out the opportunities available in your district and how to access them.

Western Australia

Who can do an ASbA?

You need to be a full time school student who is generally 15 years or older; have support and agreement from your school to do the program; meet any special requirements for employment and training in your chosen industry; and be an Australian citizen or hold a relevant visa. You can find more information here.

How do I complete my ASbA and my school-work?

You and your school must agree to release the student into the workplace for two days per week (consecutive days and Thursdays and Fridays are preferred) on the understanding that they will maintain their school subjects .

The student will attend school for the remaining three days while completing Years 11 and 12. The student will also have to work in the school holidays unless they have organised entitled annual or sick leave with their employing agency.

You can find more information here.

Is an ASbA like VET in Schools?

There are several differences between VET in schools and ASbAs. Primarily, ASbA’s require paid employment through a ‘third party’ employer whilst VET in Schools require students to complete VET units through a TAFE or RTO.

Students can choose to complete VET studies as part of their senior school certificate. In these cases, the VET units may count towards the student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) or Overall Position (OP). If a VET subject is not available at their school, students can enrol at a TAFE or other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) — in some cases, even a neighbouring school. Students who complete VET studies in Years 11 and 12 may be granted Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) if they choose to progress to higher-level study.

ASbA’s involve students completing an apprenticeship or traineeship part time during their senior secondary studies, with options including anything from carpentry to hairdressing.

You can find out more here.

What Apprenticeships can I undertake with an ASbA?

Eligible ASbAs vary state-to-state. When considering an ASbA, choose an apprenticeship or traineeship that is approved as an ASbA in your state.

You can find this information in the Job and Training Description Search. When searching, be sure you are looking at the information true for your state.

Once you have considered your options and decided on an apprenticeship or traineeship, you must find an employer who is willing to take you on as an ASbA. The Steps to an Australian Apprenticeship gives tips on what to do.

Once you have found an employer, an Australian Apprenticeship Support Network provider will need to do the sign up. They will talk to the employer, the school, and if you are under 18 to your parent or caregiver.

No-one at my school is doing one, does that mean I can’t?

Your school must approve your ASbA before you start, and will help facilitate details of the employment and training. Your school timetable will need to work with your ASbA training and employment.

By starting an Australian Apprenticeship under a school-based arrangement, you may be able to knock 1-2 years off an apprenticeship and even complete a traineeship depending on the qualification. The duration depends on the type of apprenticeship or traineeship, the industry and the qualification.

If you are interested in starting a School-based Apprenticeship, it’s important to speak to the relevant teacher, Careers Advisor, or Career Counsellor at your school as soon as possible to find out the opportunities available in your district and how to access them.

South Australia

Who can do an ASbA?

Any student can begin an ASbA, as long as they are:

  • in year 10 or above
  • enrolled in SACE or equivalent
  • undertaking studies which may contribute to the achievement of SACE or equivalent, or
  • a vocational education and training (VET) qualification, or both.

You can find out more here.

How do I complete my ASbA and my school-work?

The level of impact on a student's school timetable is not mandated. In most cases, the student's school is best placed to decide whether proposed arrangements impact sufficiently so that the apprenticeship or traineeship forms part of the student's school program and can be undertaken under school-based arrangements.

Possible ways that a SAT may impact on a student's school timetable may include:

  • paid employment undertaken during normal school hours, and/or
  • training undertaken during normal school hours, and/or
  • reducing the number of subjects studied to allow the student to work and/or train.
  • For example, the school-based apprentice or trainee may attend work on Wednesday afternoons instead of sport; a foreign language subject may be dropped to undertake the SAT. The amended timetable must reflect the changes made to accommodate the SAT.

There is no requirement to document the student's full school, training and work schedule (other than the school timetable) in a particular way, however the parties must be able to show, at audit, a schedule has been developed and the parties have agreed to it.

You can find more information here.

Is an ASbA like VET in Schools?

There are several differences between VET in schools and ASbAs. Primarily, ASbA’s require paid employment through a ‘third party’ employer whilst VET in Schools require students to complete VET units through a TAFE or RTO.

Students can choose to complete VET studies as part of their senior school certificate. In these cases, the VET units may count towards the student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) or Overall Position (OP). If a VET subject is not available at their school, students can enrol at a TAFE or other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) — in some cases, even a neighbouring school. Students who complete VET studies in Years 11 and 12 may be granted Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) if they choose to progress to higher-level study.

ASbA’s involve students completing an apprenticeship or traineeship part time during their senior secondary studies, with options including anything from carpentry to hairdressing.

You can find out more here.

What Apprenticeships can I undertake with an ASbA?

Eligible ASbAs vary state-to-state. When considering an ASbA, choose an apprenticeship or traineeship that is approved as an ASbA in your state.

You can find this information in the Job and Training Description Search. When searching, be sure you are looking at the information true for your state.

Once you have considered your options and decided on an apprenticeship or traineeship, you must find an employer who is willing to take you on as an ASbA. The Steps to an Australian Apprenticeship gives tips on what to do.

Once you have found an employer, an Australian Apprenticeship Support Network provider will need to do the sign up. They will talk to the employer, the school, and if you are under 18 to your parent or caregiver.

No-one at my school is doing one, does that mean I can’t?

Your school must approve your ASbA before you start, and will help facilitate details of the employment and training. Your school timetable will need to work with your ASbA training and employment.

By starting an Australian Apprenticeship under a school-based arrangement, you may be able to knock 1-2 years off an apprenticeship and even complete a traineeship depending on the qualification. The duration depends on the type of apprenticeship or traineeship, the industry and the qualification.

If you are interested in starting a School-based Apprenticeship, it’s important to speak to the relevant teacher, Careers Advisor, or Career Counsellor at your school as soon as possible to find out the opportunities available in your district and how to access them.

Tasmania

Who can do an ASbA?

Students in Year 10, 11 or 12 are able to combine work, training and education to gain a nationally recognised qualification, usually at Certificate II or III level – across almost every industry sector and training package. You can find out more here.

How do I complete my ASbA and my school-work?

Every school/college will have appointed an ASbA Facilitator who will:

  • Receive correspondence from the Apprenticeship Network Provider (ANP) seeking endorsement for the ASbA opportunity, and manage the administrative and pastoral care responsibilities on behalf of the ASbA student’s school, including timetabling arrangements and negotiating work hours with the employer.
  • Work out how many points the ASbA training and qualification will contribute to the TCE in years 11 or 12, and what are the best subjects for the ASbA student to do at the same time.
  • Organise monthly meetings with the ASbA student to identify any issues with regard to attendance and participation, or help resolve or refer any work related concerns.
  • Liaise with the ANP, the RTO, the employer and the DoE ASbA Unit as required.

The employer will:

  • Ensure that the ASbA student has a minimum of 7.5 hours of employment every week during school time, and additional hours in term breaks. ASbA students must have a Training Contract approved by Skills Tasmania and endorsed by their school Principal, and be employed under an award or other appropriate industrial agreement. The wage will depend on the ASbA student’s age, industry and qualification.
  • Ensure there is a Training Plan in place and negotiate with the RTO to ensure the ASbA student regularly receives training and appropriate support towards the ASbA qualification.
  • Ensure that the hours of work can be flexibly negotiated to best fit with the ASbA student’s school/college timetable, subject selections and exam periods.

You can find out more here.

Is an ASbA like VET in Schools?

There are several differences between VET in schools and ASbAs. Primarily, ASbA’s require paid employment through a ‘third party’ employer whilst VET in Schools require students to complete VET units through a TAFE or RTO.

Students can choose to complete VET studies as part of their senior school certificate. In these cases, the VET units may count towards the student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) or Overall Position (OP). If a VET subject is not available at their school, students can enrol at a TAFE or other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) — in some cases, even a neighbouring school. Students who complete VET studies in Years 11 and 12 may be granted Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) if they choose to progress to higher-level study.

ASbA’s involve students completing an apprenticeship or traineeship part time during their senior secondary studies, with options including anything from carpentry to hairdressing.

You can find out more here.

What Apprenticeships can I undertake with an ASbA?

Eligible ASbAs vary state-to-state. When considering and ASbA, choose an apprenticeship or traineeship that is approved as an ASbA in your state.

You can find this information in the Job and Training Description Search. When searching, be sure you are looking at the information true for your state.

Once you have considered your options and decided on an apprenticeship or traineeship for you, you must find an employer who is willing to take you on as an ASbA. The Steps to an Australian Apprenticeship gives tips on what to do.

Once you have found an employer, an Australian Apprenticeship Support Network provider will need to do the sign up. They will talk to the employer, the school, and if you are under 18 to your parent or caregiver.

No-one at my school is doing one, does that mean I can’t?

Your school must approve your ASbA before you start, and will help facilitate details of the employment and training. Your school timetable will need to work with your ASbA training and employment.

By starting an Australian Apprenticeship under a school-based arrangement, you may be able to knock 1-2 years off an apprenticeship and even complete a traineeship depending on the qualification. The duration depends on the type of apprenticeship or traineeship, the industry and the qualification.

If you are interested in starting a School-based Apprenticeship, it’s important to speak to the relevant teacher, Careers Advisor, or Career Counsellor at your school as soon as possible to find out the opportunities available in your district and how to access them.

 

Hollee was never too fond of school, but she knew that simply leaving school wasn't the right path for her. Now she has the best of both worlds with an Australian School-based Apprenticeship. See more about Hollee's experience below. 

For more information about Australian School-based Apprenticeships, speak to you schools careers advisor or visit the AAPathways website here

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